• Author : alton

 
 

EVPN Transit Route VRF Leaking

Description As described in the L3 EVPN VXLAN Configuration Guide, it is common practice to use Layer 3 EVPN to provide multi-tenancy within a datacenter. This is achieved by keeping each tenant’s prefixes in separate VRFs.   In order to allow hosts from different VRFs to communicate with each other, a new mechanism lets the Spine act as a VTEP to which cross-VRF traffic will be directed for leaking.   The Spine will: Import specific learned IP or IPv6 prefixes belonging to one VRF into another Advertise these leaked routes to relevant EVPN neighbors (Leafs) with itself as next-hop. Furthermore,...
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EVPN Centralized Anycast Gateway

Description In the Centralized Anycast Gateway configuration, the Spines are configured with EVPN-IRB and are used as the IP Default Gateway(DWG), whereas the Top of rack switches perform L2 EVPN Routing. EVPN-IRB  supports both Virtual eXtensible Local Area Network (VXLAN) Bridging and IP Routing on the top of rack (TOR) switch.  In a typical EVPN IRB deployment, the IP Default Gateway(DGW) for a host (or VM) is the IP address configured on the IRB interface (check out the EVPN IRB TOI for more detail).   Platform compatibility DCS-7050X* DCS-7050X2 DCS-7050X3 DCS-7300/DCS-7320 DCS-7300X3 DCS-7260X* (DCS-7260X, DCS-7260X2, DCS-7260X3) DCS-7280R, DCS-7280R2, DCS-7280R3 DCS-7500R, DCS-7500R2,...
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EVPN VxLAN IPV6 Overlay

Description Starting with EOS release 4.22.0F, the EVPN VXLAN L3 Gateway using EVPN IRB supports routing traffic from IPV6 host to another IPV6 host on a stretched Vxlan VLAN. This TOI explains the EOS configuration and show commands. Platform compatibility Platform Supporting ND Proxy and ND Suppression DCS-7280R/7280R2 DCS-7050CX3-32S-F DCS-7050SX3-48YC12-F ( Starting in 4.22.1F ) DCS-7050SX3-48YC8 ( Starting in 4.22.1F ) DCS-7050/7050X/7050X2 ( Starting in 4.22.1F ) DCS-7260X/7260X3 ( Starting in 4.22.1F ) DCS-7060X/7060X2 ( Starting in 4.21.1F ) DCS-7250 ( Starting in 4.22.1F ) DCS-7300/DCS-7320 ( Starting in 4.22.1F ) Platform Compatibility (No ND Proxy, No ND Suppression) DCS-7020R...
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EVPN MLAG Shared Router MAC

Description “MLAG Domain Shared Router MAC” is a new mechanism to introduce a new router MAC to be used for MLAG TOR Leaf pairs.  The user can have either explicitly configured MAC address of their choice or use the system generated MLAG system-id for this purpose.   When the MLAG shared MAC is set as the MLAG system ID value, the new shared MAC has the following properties: Unlike the bridge MAC which is different on each peer, this MLAG Domain shared router MAC has the same exact value on MLAG peers forming the same MLAG domain. This new shared...
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EVPN Centralized Anycast Gateway

EVPN Centralized Anycast Gateway Description EVPN IRB interface supports both L2 switching and L3 Vxlan Routing on the same TOR switch.  In a typical EVPN IRB deployment, the IP Default Gateway(DGW) for a host (or VM) is the IP address configured on the IRB interface (check out the EVPN IRB TOI for more detail).  To have the closest TOR to always perform both Vxlan bridging as well as Vxlan Routing, always configure the IRB interfaces as the DGW on all the TORs. This model is commonly known as “distributed Vxlan Routing with EVPN”.  This model is supported in EVPN since...
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EVPN IRB with Vxlan Underlay

EVPN Integrated Routing and Bridging (IRB) with VXLAN In the traditional data center design, inter-subnet forwarding is provided by a centralised router, where traffic traverses across the network to a centralised routing node and back again to its final destination. In a large multi-tenant data center environment this operational model can lead to inefficient use of bandwidth and sub-optimal forwarding. To provide a more optimal forwarding model and avoid traffic tromboning, the EVPN inter-subnet draft (draft-sajassi-l2vpn-evpn-inter-subnet-forwarding) proposes integrating the routing and bridging (IRB) functionality directly onto the VTEP, thereby allowing the routing operation to occur as close to the end...
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