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DMF Upgrade procedures 7.x.x+

ContentsDMF Upgrade ProceduresOverviewSwitch/Node upgradesSteps for Upgrading Controllers 7.x.x to 8.x.xCopying Upgrade image to controllerOption 1Option 2Controller upgradeAnalytics and Recorder Nodes DMF Upgrade Procedures Overview This Document will provide the necessary steps to upgrade DMF and its respected nodes individually from 7.x.x onward. These upgrade steps are also present in the DMF deployment guide, starting on chapter 6. https://www.arista.com/en/support/software-download Switch/Node upgrades After the controllers have upgraded, the switches will automatically reboot to upgrade. Service nodes, starting from 7.x.x, will upgrade automatically similarly to fabric switches. Analytics and Recorder nodes need to be upgraded separately, which will be covered later in this...
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DMF Downgrade/ Fresh Install

ContentsDMF Downgrade/ Fresh InstallIDRAC Fresh InstallBooting with Alternate Partition DMF Downgrade/ Fresh Install   Please be advised downgrading of DMF version image using the “upgrade launch” procedure is not supported. There are 2 ways to perform the downgrades. Loading the alternate boot partition which consists of the previous DMF version image or doing a fresh install via IDRAC. IDRAC Fresh install may be used when you don’t have the previous DMF image on the alternate partition. IDRAC Fresh Install Using IDRAC we can perform a fresh install of the ISO on a device. The process is the same for Controller...
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BFD troubleshooting tips

ContentsBFD quick introduction:Troubleshooting BFD commands:Troubleshooting steps:1) BFD goes down because of underlying physical interface going down:2) If bfd packets are blocked by any ACLs3) Check if bfd packets are sent and received properly4) In the above cases, the problem is live. But what if the problem is intermittent and bfd session goes down at unpredictable times. 5) BFD packets are sent properly but the session still goes down. 6) QOS settings: BFD quick introduction: What is BFD? Bidirectional Forwarding Detection(BFD) is a low overhead protocol designed to provide rapid detection of failures in the path between adjacent forwarding engines over any media...
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Setting up AD, NPS, and RADIUS authentication using Windows NPS

ContentsOverviewDefinitionLab SetupConfiguring Windows NPS and ADAdding Users and Groups to ADRADIUS Server configurationConfiguring NPS policiesConfiguring the Arista SwitchSetting up CVP to authenticate users using RADIUS Overview This article will guide through setting up Network Policy Server (NPS) on a Windows Server along with Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS). In addition, this document will address the required parameters to successfully authenticate users to login into Arista switches and CVP using RADIUS. Definition Network Policy Server (NPS) – This feature allows administrators to define policies for Network access authentication, authorization and accounting for wireless, authenticating switch, and remote access dial-up, and...
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Extending EVPN and VXLAN to the Host

ContentsOverviewGoalsTopologySoftware VersionsConfigurationSpine Configuration (route server)Leaf-1a/b ConfigurationHost ConfigurationLinuxFRRTestingTroubleshootingChecking the EVPN peering and routes on the spines/route-serversChecking FRRChecking that FRR has correctly provided the information to the kernelCaveatsAlternative Configuration Options Overview VxLAN provides a highly scalable, standards based approach for constructing L2 overlays on top of routed networks. It is defined in RFC7348, and encapsulates the original host Ethernet frame in a UDP + IP + Ethernet frame. BGP EVPN (RFC 7432 and RFC 8365 for its application to VXLAN) is a standards based control protocol to efficiently discover other endpoints (VTEPs) and distribute reachability information (MAC addresses). This post assumes the reader is...
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Recommended Configurations for Multicast Using Anycast-RP

ContentsOverviewUse CasesTroubleshooting Steps Overview Multicast is a means of sending data from one source to many receivers.  To understand what one to many looks like no further than a TV streaming service and or a paging system which calls only certain phones.  Unlike broadcast which multicast may act like depending on the design, typically multicast packets are not meant for the whole network but to a set of end points for a specific group.  Sending to a group is achieved by sending data to a multicast IP whose range is from 224.0.0.1 to 239.255.255.255.   For data to flow from its...
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Using the CloudVision API with Service Accounts

ContentsDescriptionPlatform CompatibilityHow TocURLPythoncvpracrequestsAdditional Resources Description With the release of CloudVision Portal 2020.3, you have the ability to create Service Accounts. I won’t show you how to create a Service Account, but you can go to this TOI to read about that. This article will show you how to use Service Account Tokens in Python and cURL for API calls. Platform Compatibility This applies to both CVaaS and on-premise installations. How To Using a Service Account Token allows you to bypass the standard authentication process when making API calls. It also allows you to create a local “account” on CloudVision that doesn’t...
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Basic Campus Quality of Service (QoS) design

ContentsIntroductionWhat do we want to achieveDesignConfigurationSSID configurationSwitch configurationTesting the QoS in a congested environmentSwitch shaping configuration Introduction Quality of Service (QoS) is the ability to provide different priorities to different applications, users, or data flows, or to guarantee a certain level of performance to a data flow. QoS processes apply to traffic that flows through Ethernet ports and control planes. These processes can modify data fields (Class of Service (CoS) or Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP)) or assign data streams to traffic classes for prioritised handling. In this document we will be implementing a basic enterprise QoS model. Consider the...
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Managing Containers on EOS – container-manager

ContentsContainers on EOSContainer-ManagerInitial ConfigurationEnabling container managerAdding a registryDaemon ArgumentsContainer ConfigurationSample ContainerOther container configuration optionsExec CommandsStorage & PersistenceSample RunOther Examples Containers on EOS Container-based deployments make creating cloud portable applications extremely easy. An application can be written on normal build infrastructure, that in turn can be run on a EOS switch or any Linux device that runs docker run time engine. So the same applications that are ran on a server for microservices can be run on switch with Arista EOS. Since Arista extensible operating system is simply linux (CentOS at this time – 2021) we are able to integrate docker...
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Verbose counters on Arista 7130 series

Arista 7130 series running MOS can give very verbose counter output using the CLI or through API. Using CLI, there are two distinct commands to show the counters which are inside the device. To view them, one enters one of the following CLI commands: For the regular (non-verbose) counter view: show interface counters For the verbose counter view: show interface counters verbose [nonzero]   ContentsCounter namingReceive 64b/66b PCS Statistics CountersReceive 8/10b PCS Statistics CountersFCS ErrorAlignment ErrorRuntFalse positivesMAC Counters Counter naming Most counters have both a “line” and “host” side counter. These counters account for the side that is connected to...
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Configure and Troubleshoot DNS on EOS

ContentsWhat is DNS?How to install it on EOS switch?ConfigurationVerificationTroubleshooting What is DNS? The Domain Name Server (DNS) maps FQDN labels to IP addresses and provides addresses for network devices. How to install it on EOS switch? EOS has a pre-installed DNSmasq service that can be used as a lightweight DNS server. The switch can be used in the recursive mode to take the local and external requests and forward them to an upstream DNS server.  Each network requires at least one server to resolve addresses. The configuration file can list a maximum of three server addresses. Configuration Step 1: In...
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Understanding interface breakout modes on Arista switches

Arista switches have the capability to break out QSFP and OSFP interfaces to multiple lanes of smaller speeds. This can be very useful for high density deployments that require a minimal RU footprint by maximizing the ports available on various Arista platforms. With QSFP interfaces, whether it be for 40G or 100G speeds, these are implemented as 4 lanes that can be independently controlled & configured. With 40G interfaces, these interfaces can operate in 4x10G speeds and for 100G interfaces can operate in 4x25G or 2x50G speeds .        As an example, with the Arista 7280CR2A-30 switch which comes with 30...
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Pushing a Python Script to Devices Using CVP (SWIX)

ContentsIntroductionPackaging the Script Into an RPMCreating the SWIX and Installing Locally to TestCreating an Image Bundle in CVP and Assigning to a DeviceVerifying After the SWIX Has Been Installed Introduction In a previous article, I discussed how to push a simple Python script to managed devices with CVP through a configlet. In this article, I will show how to create and install an extension with the same python hello script through an image bundle in CVP. This method is useful if the script is very long and/or has dependencies.   Packaging the Script Into an RPM First, we will need...
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Pushing a Python Script to Devices Using CVP (Configlet)

ContentsIntroductionCreating the ConfigletExecuting the Configlet and VerificationRemoving the Used Configlet Introduction This method is useful for pushing simple scripts to managed devices in CVP. This is not suitable for long scripts or scripts with dependencies. It may work, but creating extensions is a far more structured approach which I talk about here.   Creating the Configlet We will use an event-handler to assist us in creating the script on the switch due to its ability to execute multiple line bash commands. We are not able to use bash commands natively in  CVP configlets. To start the simple method, create the...
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TerminAttr most commonly used flags and sample configurations

ContentsIntroductionHow to check which version of TerminAttr is running on EOSHow to check if TerminAttr is runningTerminAttr flagsTerminAttr configuration examples1) Streaming to CloudVision on-prem2) Streaming to Cloudvision as a Service3) Streaming to an on-prem instance and to CloudVision as a Service4) Streaming to 3rd party systems Introduction TerminAttr is the EOS state streaming telemetry agent running as a single binary that can stream to both CloudVision and 3rd party applications using gNMI. It has been bundled with every EOS release from 4.17.0F and above and it’s also available as a SWIX extension which can be used to upgrade TerminAttr to...
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Create a CloudEOS IP Fabric in a Cloud Provider Using Terraform and CloudVision as-a-Service

ContentsObjectiveObtain a CloudVision as-a-Service AccountDownload and Install TerraformDownload and Install Cloud Provider CLIFor AWS Cloud DeploymentFor Azure Cloud deploymentCloud Provider Portal ActionsFor AWS Cloud DeploymentFor Azure Cloud DeploymentDownload CloudEOS Example RepositoryCloudVision as-a-Service Items to CompleteCreate a ContainerConfigure instances’ username/password Create ConfigletAttach the Configlet to the Container CreatedGenerate the CloudVision as-a-Service Token for CloudEOS OnboardingEdit input_vars.tfvars FileCloudEOS Repository StructureFor AWS Cloud DeploymentFor Azure Cloud DeploymentDeploy ResourcesExplore the TopologyExplore CloudVision as-a-ServiceMulti-Cloud DashboardTopology View and Cloud SegmentsLogin to InstancesDestroy Resources Objective The goal of this document is to guide you through the setup of CloudEOS in AWS and/or Azure using CloudVision as-a-Service and the...
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gNMIReverse Examples

ContentsIntroductionPrerequisiteInstalling and configuring gNMIReverse clientBuilding the client and server binariesgNMIReverse client daemon ConfigurationNon-default VRFDefault VRFRunning the gNMIReverse ServerSubscribing to eos_native pathsSubscribing to Smash pathsReferences Introduction gNMIReverse is a Dial-Out gRPC service (available on our Github page) that reverses the direction of the dial for gNMI Subscriptions, where the gNMIReverse client (running along with gNMI target) on the switch sends data to the gNMIReverse Server. This article contains steps on how to build the gNMIReverse client and server binaries and examples on how to configure the daemon to run the gNMIReverse client on EOS. Prerequisite The following tools are required to...
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Understanding and Interpreting SNMP outputs for switch entities

This article provides an overview on how to interpret the values returned by SNMP on polling certain MIB objects related to physical entities such as sensor values of different components from a switch. ContentsOverview of Entity MIBSHow to find the correct MIB entries and OIDsExamplesExample 1.) Calculating and Interpreting Fan speedsExample 2.) Calculating and Interpreting transceiver readingsKey TakeawaysReferences Overview of Entity MIBS To provide a quick overview, Arista supports the following standard MIBs:  ENTITY-MIB (RFC4133) ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB (RFC4268) ENTITY-STATE-MIB (RFC3433) ..and also a proprietary MIB: ARISTA-ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB ENTITY-MIB describes a set of MIB objects that can be used to poll information regarding...
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Understanding Table Sizes on the 7050QX-32

A common question asked about Arista switches is “how many routes can they handle”, and unfortunately, this is never an easy question to answer. Dedicated switch ASIC hardware is required to program each route so that when a packet arrives with a certain destination address, the switch can look up the destination and route the packet to the correct interface at line-rate across all the ports. The part that makes it hard is that there is practically never a 1:1 mapping between hardware resources on a switch and the number of routes that can be programmed into them, and under...
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Curl’ing with EOS and third party devices

Perhaps you’re aware that EOS is based on Linux, which comes with many powerful & useful built-in utilities. I recently wrote an EOS Central article on sed. Even if you are not a pure networking person (perhaps you’re a server person), many of the familiar Linux tools you have used in your past exist on EOS natively today. One of my customers recently shared an experience with me that made me smile because they had now started to embrace the Linux underpinnings & power of EOS after running into a configuration challenge with a 3rd party (television) broadcast IP/SDI gateway...
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