Export CVP Functionality to Ansible

In some network environments there is a separation of responsibility for the network infrastructure and the server side equipment. In these environments, different groups responsible for managing different equipment could use different tools for the job. This guide will discuss one of the several options for integrating Arista’s network management tool, CloudVision Portal (CVP), into an Ansible environment. Summary In this example, the environment uses Ansible as the configuration management tool for server provisioning but uses CVP for network management. The environment is set up to allow the server team to provision top of rack switch ports for servers using...
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Leveraging CVP Telemetry and ZTP in an Ansible Environment

This guide will discuss one of several options for integrating Arista’s network management tool, CloudVision Portal (CVP), into an Ansible environment. Summary In data center environments where Ansible is used for configuration management of all devices including networking equipment, the network operations team may want to leverage the telemetry and Zero Touch Provisioning (ZTP) functionality provided by the CloudVision Portal product. In this example, CVP will be used for ZTP, image upgrades, and telemetry while Ansible will be used to manage the switch configuration directly. Documentation for setting up ZTP can be found in the CloudVision configuration guide. Implementation This...
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Ansible 1.8 to 2.1 Upgrade

My company has been using Ansible to configure our Arista switches.  We were using Ansible 1.8 with the ‘arista.eos’ role.  We have now upgraded to Ansible 2.2 have started to migrate our ansible-playbook to use the built-in role (e.g. eos_config).  However, we have ran into a very basic problem. Running ansible-playbook with ‘-vvvv’ flag, I’m getting the following error msg: “paramiko is required but does not appear to be installed” I have verified that paramiko is indeed installed on my host running ansible-playbook. Do I have to install it on the Arista switch as well?  (pip list on EOS Bash...
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Configure CVX and VXLAN with Ansible

Purpose: This Ansible playbook allows an administrator to easily configure a Cloud Vision Exchange (CVX) environment as well as configure a Virtual Extensible LAN (VXLAN) between two switches in an environment built using Arista switches, whether they be physical or virtual (vEOS). It is ideally suited for test environments and administrators wanting to test CVX and VXLAN. The playbook can be modified for more complex deployments. Running the playbook: From the /etc/ansible directory in the Linux CLI run: ansible-playbook cvx_vxlan_playbook.yaml Prerequisites: An Ansible server (http://docs.ansible.com/ansible/intro_installation.html) arista.eos roles for Ansible v1.0.1 # sudo ansible-galaxy install arista.eos. Rename the following files under...
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Ansible playbook for CVX and VXLAN configuration.

Purpose: This playbook allows an administrator to easily configure Cloud Vision Exchange (CVX)  and Virtual Extensible LAN (VXLAN) between two Arista switches. It is ideally suited for test environments and administrators wanting to test CVX and VXLAN functionality. The playbook can be modified for more advanced deployments. Running the playbook: From the cli under the /etc/ansible directory run: ansible-playbook cvx_vxlan_playbook.yaml Prerequisites: An Ansible server (http://docs.ansible.com/ansible/intro_installation.html) arista.eos roles for Ansible v1.0.1. To install run # sudo ansible-galaxy install arista.eos on the Ansible server. Rename the following files under /etc/ansible/roles/arista.eos/library to not have a .py extension i.e eos_config.py becomes eos_config.  # cp...
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My journey with Ansible and Arista

Before I joined the ranks of Arista, my primary focus was technical refreshes and configuration documentation to support a PVST+ and OSPF architecture.  Yes – PVST+.  Yes – not RSTP.  I don’t say that to knock the place, I say that to give you an idea of where I’m coming from.  I was completely focused on spanning tree and routing protocols – primarily OSPF.  I had blinders on and didn’t want to do anything but routing and switching in a certain vendor’s world. Needless to say, transitioning from that place to working for Arista Networks was like Charlie stepping into...
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Introducing Arista EOS Roles for Ansible

This article introduces the newly released Arista EOS role for Ansible.  The Arista EOS role provides a set of Ansible modules that can used in playbooks for automating the configuration of network resources contained in Arista EOS nodes.  The EOS role replaces the existing arista_* modules that are currently available in the Ansible distribution.  The base code that comprises the EOS role has been re-worked from the beginning, influenced by lessons learned from the first generation modules.   In addition, the EOS role now takes advantage of Ansible Galaxy to provide a streamlined distribution mechanism to make getting started with...
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