Demo: CloudVision skill for Amazon Alexa

Great APIs accelerate development of new applications and integration with existing tools and services. Check out the sample CloudVision skill for Amazon Alexa that the EOS+ Consulting Services team put together one afternoon! Please share and use the comments to tell us about other integrations that you would find interesting and useful!

Alias – Simple yet powerful

Alias – Simple yet powerful About: Alias mySimpleAlias <a maybe complicated command you would never remember> Alias commands can be composed of multiple lines and embed variables. Below is an example of alias used as configuration template for automating configuration with just few arguments. Sunch template can satisfy complex configurations and be highly reusable. This high-level scripting or command bundling is simple to implement yet powerful. The below example is a multi-line alias with variables (%<x>) alias set-baremetal !! Syntax : set-baremetal <INTF> <Po ID> <DESCR> <VLAN> !! Example: set-baremetal e1,2 po1 “To Server 42” 200 10 config 20 interface...
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Export CVP Functionality to Ansible

In some network environments there is a separation of responsibility for the network infrastructure and the server side equipment. In these environments, different groups responsible for managing different equipment could use different tools for the job. This guide will discuss one of the several options for integrating Arista’s network management tool, CloudVision Portal (CVP), into an Ansible environment. Summary In this example, the environment uses Ansible as the configuration management tool for server provisioning but uses CVP for network management. The environment is set up to allow the server team to provision top of rack switch ports for servers using...
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Leveraging CVP Telemetry and ZTP in an Ansible Environment

This guide will discuss one of several options for integrating Arista’s network management tool, CloudVision Portal (CVP), into an Ansible environment. Summary In data center environments where Ansible is used for configuration management of all devices including networking equipment, the network operations team may want to leverage the telemetry and Zero Touch Provisioning (ZTP) functionality provided by the CloudVision Portal product. In this example, CVP will be used for ZTP, image upgrades, and telemetry while Ansible will be used to manage the switch configuration directly. Documentation for setting up ZTP can be found in the CloudVision configuration guide. Implementation This...
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Using vEOS with Vagrant and VirtualBox

Beginning with EOS 4.15.2F, vEOS is available as a Vagrant box for VirtualBox.  This single-file VM package makes it one of the fastest ways to get started with vEOS and is ideal for testing in automated environments.  Multiple VMs may be defined within a single Vagrantfile, including non-vEOS VMs, allowing an entire topology to be defined in a single file.  A customized Vagrantfile, checked in to revision control, is an effective way for multiple users to consistently recreate a complete environment. Prior to EOS 4.15.2F, the vEOS vmdk and Aboot.iso files can be converted to a Vagrant box by following the directions...
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My journey with Ansible and Arista

Before I joined the ranks of Arista, my primary focus was technical refreshes and configuration documentation to support a PVST+ and OSPF architecture.  Yes – PVST+.  Yes – not RSTP.  I don’t say that to knock the place, I say that to give you an idea of where I’m coming from.  I was completely focused on spanning tree and routing protocols – primarily OSPF.  I had blinders on and didn’t want to do anything but routing and switching in a certain vendor’s world. Needless to say, transitioning from that place to working for Arista Networks was like Charlie stepping into...
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eAPI and Unix Domain Socket

Introduction Today’s data centers cry out for automation. There are many approaches that Network Operators can leverage, but one method that is very powerful is using Arista’s eAPI command interface. When eAPI is enabled, the switch accepts commands using Arista’s CLI syntax, and responds with machine-readable output and errors serialized in JSON, served over HTTP or HTTPS. It’s very easy to use and exceptionally powerful. Other blogs and articles have discussed the usage of eAPI for scripts. The purpose of this article is to cover a new access method introduced in EOS 4.14.5, which allows local access to the eAPI...
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Quick and Easy vEOS Lab Setup (VMware or VirtualBox)

Introduction A local vEOS lab is always helpful when trying out new features or validating configuration. So how would you like to be able to setup a 4-node spine/leaf virtual lab pictured below with one simple command? user:packer-veos user$ ./create-veos.py -H virtualbox And what if you wanted to try out the ZTPServer with this new set of nodes? user:packer-ztpserver user$ ./create-ztpserver.py -H virtualbox -o fedora This is possible with the help of the EOS+ Consulting Services Github projects: packer-veos packer-ztpserver Follow the READMEs at those individual repos to setup your virtual machines, but here’s a quick overview of the process....
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Introduction to Managing EOS Devices – Automation and Extensibility

Note: This article is part of the Introduction to Managing EOS Devices series: https://eos.arista.com/introduction-to-managing-eos-devices/      5) Automation and Extensibility   The Arista EOS facilitates task automation, provisioning, and extending capabilities on the Arista switches. The following features are available on all the platforms: Managing extensions and applications AEM: Event Manager AEM: CLI Scheduler     5.1) Managing EOS Extensions   The most simple and efficient way to make the most of the extensibility on which EOS is built is through the use of extensions.  An extension is a pre-packaged optional feature or set of scripts in an RPM or SWIX format....
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ZTP basic setup guide

Introduction This guide details how to use Zero Touch Provisioning (ZTP) on Arista switches. Arista’s Zero Touch Provisioning is used to configure a switch without user intervention. Built to fully leverage the power of Arista’s Extensible Operating System (EOS), ZTP provides a flexible solution, provisioning the network infrastructure without requiring a network engineer present at install. Compatibility: ZTP is supported with EOS version 4.7.0 or later Supported on Arista 7xxx Fixed Configuration switches Supported on Arista 7500 platform with version 4.10.1 or later From version 4.10.1 ZTP is supported in all Arista hardware with minimum version requirement. Note: As of...
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