• Tag : EOS-4.15.2F

 
 

Automatic MLAG ISSU Compatibility Detection

This feature detects whether a given EOS image is MLAG ISSU compatible with the currently running version on a switch. If the given new image is found to be incompatible then all EOS versions which are potentially compatible to both the given EOS image and the currently running image are listed. Also this adds support to generate additional Mlag ISSU compatibility warnings while reloading the switch or while issuing ‘show mlag issu warning’ command. All the EOS images has an Mlag ISSU Compatibility matrix published as part of the Release Notes. This matrix shows which images are compatible to a...
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ACL Based QoS on SVIs

This feature enables user to modify QoS parameters for SVI traffic (L3 VLAN) based on ACL classification. The QoS actions will be applicable only to routed traffic flowing through the members of the corresponding VLAN. This feature is only supported on ingress traffic. The user can configure the following QoS actions : Outgoing COS re-write Outgoing DSCP re-write Selection of traffic-class Policing Platform compatibility DCS-7500E DCS-7280E DCS-7010 DCS-7050 DCS-7050X DCS-7250X DCS-7300X DCS-7020TR Configuration Please refer to EOS configuration guide to configure ACL based QoS. Once the policy-map is created it can be configured on SVI as shown below, switch(config)#interface vlan...
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Maintenance mode

Maintenance mode is a framework to allow for the easy removal of elements of a switch or the entire switch from service with minimal configuration. The reasons for taking the switch out of the network could be many, including an EOS image upgrade, replacement of hardware, or recabling. The maintenance mode operation also allows the switch or switch elements to rejoin the network gracefully after all maintenance operations are performed. As this operation removes a switch or switch elements from service, the network must support the necessary network-level redundancy to either minimize or avoid loss of traffic. Maintenance mode operation Traffic flow pattern between TOR and Core...
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Routing adjacency across VRFs with external physical loopback

This feature allows routing traffic across two Vrf domains on the same switch using an external loopback cable connecting ports in different Vrf domains. If a packet received in Vrf1 is forwarded to the interconnect port (either by static route or by default route), the packet is received back in Vrf2 on the same switch. This packet is then forwarded using Vrf2 routing table. Platform compatibility DCS-7300X (TBD: Trident based platforms) DCS-7250X (TBD: Trident based platforms) DCS-7500E Configuration There are no new CLI for configuring or enabling this feature. Here is the example configuration for the topology shown below: An interconnect...
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BGP add-path RX

BGP additional paths is an enhancement that allows a BGP router to advertise and receive multiple distinct paths for the same prefix over the same session. This results in increased path diversity in the network and has a number of important benefits such as fast traffic restoration and efficient link usage through multipathing. Additional paths IETF standard allows for advertisement of multiple paths without new paths implicitly replacing any previous paths. Each path is identified by path identifier in addition to the address prefix. In this release, support has been introduced to only receive additional paths. The ability to send...
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BGP recursive route resolution with nexthop groups

Nexthop Groups is a feature that allows users to manually configure a set of nexthops by specifying their nexthop addresses and associated encapsulation information. Each Nexthop Group is referred to by a unique name and can support a single tunnel type like GRE, MPLS, etc… Static routes that directly point to Nexthop Groups can be configured. Any traffic destined to such static routes will then be forwarded via the nexthops specified in the corresponding Nexthop Group. This feature provides ability to recursively resolve Static and BGP routes over Nexthop Groups. There is not configuration changes required as part of this...
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Static IPv4 routes with IPv6 next hops

This feature enables configuring static IPv4 routes that specify the next-hop by using an IPv6 address instead of an IPv4 address. IMPORTANT:  This is not intended to be a customer-used feature in this release, but is rather the first part of a follow-on feature in a subsequent release.  As such, the feature-specific CLIs are currently hidden.  This TOI exists to document the feature “just in case”. Platform compatibility This feature is supported on all platforms. Configuration To configure the feature, simply specify an IPv6 address instead of an IPv4 address when creating a static route in configuration mode. Arista(config)#ip route 10.0.0.0/8 a::1...
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BGP sFlow export of ECMP info

BGP sFlow export is to add BGP route information in sFlow sample packet is the destination IP matches a BGP route. Prior to and including EOS release 4.15.0F, if the route is an ECMP route, the actual path cannot be determined. In this case, the BGP next-hop is arbitrarily set to 0 and AS path information is exported as best effort. As of EOS-4.15.2F software release, DCS-7500E and DCS-7280E platforms are able to provide the actual real-time egress port information to the sFlow agent thus the agent is able to use it to find the actual ECMP path and provide...
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BGP selective route download

The BGP selective route download feature allows learning and advertising BGP prefixes without installing them in the hardware. The filtering for installation in hardware is through the route-map semantics and filtered out routes are flagged as inactive in the RIB (Routing Information Base). With the feature enabled, BGP is no longer constrained by the platform’s hardware limit and can relay much larger number of prefixes to its peers. The route-map is applied only for BGP learned paths and not on locally originating routes (e.g. BGP aggregates) or redistributed routes. BGP routes filtered out by selective route download are not used...
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Vxlan Routing

  VxLAN bridging enables stretching Layer 2 domains across a Layer 3 cloud. VxLAN routing provides the capability to route between these Layer 2 domains. On the 7050X, 7060CX, and 7260QX series, VxLAN routing is achieved by recirculating the packet multiple times through the ASIC. The routing action (which involves a L2 header rewrite), the VxLAN tunnel decapsulation action, and the VxLAN tunnel encapsulation action each requires a pass through the ASIC. The recirculation is achieved by MAC loopback on dedicated loopback interfaces. Platform compatibility The platforms with the EOS version where the feature was introduced: DCS-7050X series EOS-4.15.2F DCS-7060CX...
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BGP NSF

Description BGP Non-Stop Forwarding (NSF) aims to minimize the traffic loss when the the following scenarios occur: Stateful SwitchOver (SSO): On a dual-supervisor switch, SSO aims to minimize traffic loss when the standby supervisor takes over control of the entire system from the active supervisor (therefore becoming the new active supervisor). The switchover can be due to various reasons such as hardware/software failure on the active supervisor or explicit administrator reboot of the active supervisor. To achieve this, SSO leverages protocols capable of graceful restart to minimize traffic loss during active supervisor failover scenarios. For protocols not capable of graceful...
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v4 NLRI over BGPv6 transport

This feature enables exchanging IPv4 NLRI using MP-BGP over an IPv6 TCP connection.  Additionally, this feature adds a new configuration keyword, “auto-local-addr” which instructs the router to automatically determine what address to use as the next hop on these NLRIs, instead of requiring manual configuration. Platform compatibility The feature is supported on all platforms. Configuration All commands listed here are used in BGP configuration mode, either for the default VRF or for a non-default VRF. To enable IPv4 NLRIs over an IPv6 connection, an IPv6 neighbor must be activated in the IPv4 address family. This can be done explicitly on a...
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PIM VRF

PIM VRF feature adds VRF support to these existing multicast protocols: PIM-SM, PIM-BSR, IGMP and MSDP. Interface specific commands related to these protocols (example: ‘ip pim sparse-mode’) remain the same as before. By default, all interfaces belong to default VRF till the ‘vrf forwarding <vrf name>’ command is executed. More on ‘vrf forwarding’ command application to an interface can be found elsewhere in this manual. With VRF support, there are some significant changes to the manner in which the commands related to these protocols are applied to VRF. The configuration section explains this in more detail with examples. To maintain...
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IS-IS hostname

The IS-IS hostname feature allows the use of a human readable string to represent the symbolic name of an IS-IS router, and exchange a mapping between IS-IS system IDs and IS-IS hostnames. It also changes the output of IS-IS show commands, to show the IS-IS hostname in place of system IDs if the corresponding IS-IS hostname is known. However syslogs still use IS-IS system IDs and not the IS-IS hostname. RFC5301 describes the mechanism involved in exchanging the IS-IS hostnames using IS-IS Link State PDUs. Configuration By default if there’s a hostname configured on the switch, it is used as the IS-IS...
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ISIS wait-for-BGP

This feature extends the IS-IS set-overload-bit command to support wait-for-BGP option. In scenarios when Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) routes are resolved using Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP), if transit router reboots and becomes available again, IGP will consider the transit router for optimal path again. After rebooting, until the transit router learns external destination reachability information via BGP, it will black hole traffic. Overload bit informs other devices not to use the local router to forward transit traffic. Furthermore, attach bit is unset and route leaking and redistributing is prevented when overload bit is set. To solve aforementioned scenario, a knob...
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IS-IS SPF Timers

SPF Timers can be used in IS-IS to throttle the frequency of shortest-path-first (SPF) computations. In networks with a lot of churn, using these timers will help in containing the effect of network disruptions arising out of frequent SPF runs. SPF intervals are configured by specifying a max-wait interval, and optionally, an initial-wait interval and a hold-time. The interval between successive SPF runs is determined by using the values of the three knobs mentioned above. SPF is scheduled to run after the initial-wait interval for the first SPF run following a period of inactivity. In the event that there is...
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IS-IS Multi-Topology

IS-IS Multi-Topology support enables an IS-IS router to compute a separate topology for IPv4 and IPv6 links in the network. With this not all the links in a network need to support both IPv4 and IPv6. Some can support IPv4, some IPv6 and some can support both. The IPv4 SPF will install IPv4 routes using the IPv4 topology and similarly the IPv6 SPF will install IPv6 routes using the IPv6 topology. Without Multi-Topology (MT) support, all links in an IS-IS network need to support the same set of address families. Configuration Multi-Topology is disabled by default. To enable MT, the new multi-topology CLI...
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IS-IS set-attached-bit

Level-1-2 routers set attached-bit in their Level-1 LSPs to indicate their reachability to the rest of the network. A Level-1-2 router is considered attached only if it is able to reach a Level-2 router in a different area. Level-1 routers use this attached-bit information to install a default route to the closest attached Level-1-2 router and use it to route inter-area traffic. A route-map can be configured on a Level-1-2 router to control the setting of attached-bit in Level-1 LSPs with set-attached-bit route-map <name>. Attached-bit will be set only if the route-map is satisfied in addition to the Level-2 reachability...
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ISIS IPv6 VRF

This feature adds Intermediate System to Intermediate System (IS-IS) support for IP version 6 (IPv6) address family on virtual routing and forwarding (VRF) instance. It allows for IS-IS instances in multiple non-default VRFs on the same router and each IS-IS instance can support both IPv4 and IPv6 routing. Configuration The essential steps for configuring an IS-IS instance in a non-default VRF are described below. Configure a non-default VRF and enabled IPv6 unicast routing in it Configure an IS-IS instance in the non-default VRF Arista(config)# vrf definition test Arista(config-vrf-test)# rd 1:1 Arista(config-vrf-test)# exit Arista(config)# ipv6 unicast-routing vrf test Arista(config)#router isis 1...
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IS-IS BFD (IPv4 only)

Bidirectional Forwarding Detection(BFD) is a low overhead protocol designed to provide rapid detection of failures in the path between adjacent forwarding engines over any media and at any protocol layer.  This document describes the procedures for configuring BFD support for IS-IS for IPv4. As of EOS-4.15.XF BFD is supported for ISIS-IPv4 routes. Configuration Following commands are used to configure BFD over IS-IS. [ no ] bfd all-interfaces : This command enables/disables BFD for all the interfaces on which IS-IS is enabled. It can be overridden with the interface specific CLI. By default BFD is disabled on all the interfaces. Arista(config)#router isis 1      ...
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