Introduction to Managing EOS Devices – Memory Utilisation

A common question that users new to EOS have is concerning the high levels of memory utilisation seen on Arista switches (~70% utilised). Typically this is first flagged by the NMS and triggers a low memory warning or alarm. Unlike a traditional switching OS, EOS uses Linux page caching. Most free memory is used as a live cache and very low ‘free memory’  numbers are entirely normal, providing that enough memory is available from the buffers and cached memory for applications demanding more RAM. In this case, the OS is capable of freeing up memory from cache as processes demand it. Memory...
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Arista’s EOS Innovation Enabling Ecosystem Partner Software Development

Network software automation and intelligence is a passion we share as network engineering software developers at Intelligent Visibility, Inc. Creating innovative software solutions in the rising world of software-defined networking (SDN) can prove challenging. The source data that we require for our software is mostly located within the network device’s operating system. In the past accessing this source data has been a serious time investment mainly due to inconsistent API implementation types across different operating systems for many different hardware platforms.

Fabric Visibility

A leaf and spine fabric is challenging to monitor. The fabric spreads traffic across all the switches and links in order to maximize bandwidth. Unlike traditional hierarchical network designs, where a small number of links can be monitored to provide visibility, a leaf and spine network has no special links or switches where running CLI commands or attaching a probe would provide visibility. Even if it were possible to attach probes, the effective bandwidth of a leaf and spine network can be as high as a Petabit/second, well beyond the capabilities of current generation monitoring tools. The 2 minute video...
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Introduction to Managing EOS Devices

Summary   Several mechanisms exist to manage and instrument Arista Networks’ devices, ranging from industry standard SNMP counters to more Arista EOS/platform-centric functionality and deep debugging capabilities. The following articles introduce some fundamental management activities:   Setting up Management Monitoring Troubleshooting Platform Specific Monitoring and Troubleshooting Automation and Extensibility Annex A – Configuration Example Annex B – EOS Tips for Power Users   This document serves to highlight the basic parameters required to automate monitoring of an Arista EOS based device, while providing a high level overview of additional, more advanced functionality for low level troubleshooting and application specific monitoring. Many of the topics...
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Introduction to Managing EOS Devices – Setting up Management

Note: This article is part of the Introduction to Managing EOS Devices series: https://eos.arista.com/introduction-to-managing-eos-devices/      1) Setting Up Management The following management tools are available on Arista EOS for all platforms: VRF-aware management Telnet and SSH Syslog and Console Logging SNMP Versions 1 and 3 NTP DNS Local and remote user control (AAA) TACACS+, RADIUS sFlow XMPP eAPI   Note: in the following configuration examples, the commands in square brackets are optional: [optional]   1.1) VRF Aware Management As of release 4.10.1, EOS supports the ability to constrain management functions to a VRF. This enables the user to separate management based functions...
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Restricting access to the switch

In this article we demonstrate how you can enable your Arista switch to restrict access to various network services. By default, Arista EOS implements a control-plane ACL to restrict the packets going to the CPU.  This is done for security purposes, but in its default configuration is very permissive.  As such, it is recommended that the sources which can access the switch be restricted using the methods described below. To view the default ACL issue the following command: Arista#sh ip access-lists default-control-plane-acl IP Access List default-control-plane-acl [readonly] statistics per-entry 10 permit icmp any any [match 4, 11 days, 20:46:23 ago]...
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Dynamically update your interface name via port auto-description

Overview: Port auto-description will dynamically update the port description based on the LLDP information received from the neighbour. As always we are looking for your feedback please let us know if you have ideas on how to improve this script or other ideas… The tool: The script, called ‘portAuto’, will dynamically change the port description based on the neighbour’s LLDP information. This could be used as a stand alone script or part of a larger toolset. How to get the code: Get the code directly from Github https://github.com/arista-eosext/PortAutoDescription4 forks.7 stars.2 open issues.Recent commits: Update README.md, GitHub Add unix socket support, Philip DiLeo...
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ZTP basic setup guide

Introduction This guide details how to use Zero Touch Provisioning (ZTP) on Arista switches. Arista’s Zero Touch Provisioning is used to configure a switch without user intervention. Built to fully leverage the power of Arista’s Extensible Operating System (EOS), ZTP provides a flexible solution, provisioning the network infrastructure without requiring a network engineer present at install. Compatibility: ZTP is supported with EOS version 4.7.0 or later Supported on Arista 7xxx Fixed Configuration switches Supported on Arista 7500 platform with version 4.10.1 or later From version 4.10.1 ZTP is supported in all Arista hardware with minimum version requirement. Note: As of...
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