• Tag : security

 
 

AES-GCM Encryption of EOS Secret Configuration

Description Support for AES-GCM has been added as a method for storing symmetric secrets in EOS. This applies to secrets that must be used to remote systems, as found in NTP, TACACS+, and other places. Using this, the configuration can be secured since the secrets cannot be easily reversed or decrypted by copying the configuration out of the box. Platform Compatibility Configuring AES-GCM encrypted secrets works on all EOS platforms. Configuration Configure AES-256-GCM encrypted secret To configure AES-GCM encrypted secret on the switch, a new secret type “8a”, which stands for AES-256-GCM encryption type, has been introduced. Secrets can either...
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MSS-FW: Unidirectional Policy Enforcement

Description Macro-Segmentation Service with Layer 3 firewall (MSS-FW) enforces all security policies bi-directionally by default by creating flows that match forward and reverse direction traffic based on the tagged policy. This enhancement provides unidirectional enforcement as an option for verbatim policies. For such policies, MSS enforces the security objective (drop, allow, or redirect) only for the forward direction traffic. This will also result in better utilization of the hardware resources in such scenarios. Usage The following scenarios can be benefited by using this feature: Blocking certain client subnets to connect to a server at the top of rack switch using...
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VLAN-based Port Security

Definitions Port-wide port security: Port security with address limit on the port configured by the existing shutdown mode port security command VLAN-wide port security: Port security with address limit on VLANs configured by the new VLAN-based port security command Port-level limit: Maximum address number configured on the port for port-wide port security VLAN-level limit: Maximum address number configured on VLANs for VLAN-wide port security Description This feature adds the support for configuring port security on a per-VLAN basis for each port. It is an extension of the existing shutdown mode port security. In the existing shutdown mode port-wide port security,...
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Syslog with TLS support

Description This feature adds TLS support to the existing syslog logging mechanism. With the new added CLI commands, the user can specify an SSL profile when configuring a remote syslog server. Once configured, any traffic between the Arista device and the syslog server will be sent over TLS connections. By using TLS connections, syslog is better protected against attacks and information leakage. Platform compatibility This feature is compatible on all platforms. Configuration CLI command A remote syslog server can be configured with an SSL profile using the following CLI command: switch(config)#logging host test.example.com 1234 protocol tls ssl-profile test-profile In this...
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Group-based Multi-domain Segmentation Services (MSS-Group)

Description The Segment security feature provides the convenience of applying policies on segments rather than interfaces or subnets. Hosts/networks are classified into segments based on prefixes. Grouping prefixes into segments allows for definition of policies between segments that govern flow of traffic between them. Policies define inter-segment or intra-segment communication rules, e.g. segment A can communicate with segment B but hosts in segment B can not communicate with each other. By default traffic destined to a given segment is dropped and explicit allow policies are required to allow communication. Policy configurations in this feature are unidirectional. To allow or drop...
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Port security protect mode enhancements

Description This TOI describes a set of enhancements made to the existing Port Security: Protect Mode (PortSec-Protect) feature. Please see the existing TOI for this feature here: https://eos.arista.com/eos-4-24-0f/port-security-protect-mode/ Unless otherwise noted, all information contained in the original Protect Mode TOI continues to apply. The persistent port security feature also continues to be supported, and is described by the following TOI: https://eos.arista.com/eos-4-18-1f/port-security-preserve-macs-on-link-flapreload/ The primary enhancement is extending the limits placed by PortSec-Protect to apply to MAC addresses learned in the hardware MAC table. Previously, the port security limit would affect only the forwarding behavior, while allowing an unlimited number of MAC...
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Dynamic CLI Access VLAN

Description Dynamic CLI Access VLAN is a command that sets the effective access VLAN in a port without changing the running configuration. The use case is to provide a means for a network management system to quarantine a port in a special VLAN where the device can update its anti-virus (for instance) before exposing the device to the rest of the network. Configuration The following command in the interface configuration node sets the dynamic CLI access VLAN: (config-if-et1)# switchport access vlan dynamic <VLANID> It’s worth emphasizing that even though this is issued in the interface configuration node, it doesn’t show...
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Support for SWI extension (SWIX) verification

Description EOS provides a way to extend its capabilities through the installation of extensions. An extension is a pre-packaged optional feature or a set of scripts, typically in an RPM Package Manager (RPM) or Software image extension (SWIX) format. A SWIX file is a zip file typically containing RPMs, scripts, or other installation mediums that can be installed to alter the base behavior of EOS. SWIX Verification allows for SWIX files to be cryptographically signed with a signature that will be verified by EOS before the extension is installed. This verification process provides the following security benefits: Shows that the...
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Standalone BGP Origin Validation with RPKI

The Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) is the primary routing protocol used between the tens of thousands of different networks that make up the global Internet. Unfortunately, the original conception of BGP presumed a fundamental level of trust between all of the participating networks, which has repeatedly permitted both major and minor outages across the Internet due to networks accepting incorrect routing information. Either deliberately or accidentally, networks are able to advertise more specific prefix routing information for address space controlled by other networks to their peers over BGP, which causes that traffic to flow through their network instead of to...
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Configurations and Optimizations for Internet Edge Routing

Introduction For many years, network deployments for enterprise Internet edge environments have consisted of dedicated routing platforms and a switching or aggregation layer to distribute this to various network zones.  With the advances in merchant silicon forwarding engines and the software expertise put into Arista’s Extensible Operating System (EOS), we can now fully replace this legacy architecture with a collapsed routing and switching layer using Arista R Series platforms.  Arista R Series platforms allow for holding a full copy of the Internet routing table for both IPv4 and IPv6 in hardware (the Forwarding Information Base, or FIB) with plenty of...
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Configuring Traffic Flows using sFlow in CVP (Cloudvision Portal) 2019.1.x

Introduction Many users rely on 3rd party flow tools to enable greater visibility into the network and generate alerts when irregular flows have been detected.  However, with the growing number of tools being used to provide this visibility, each with their own strengths, the user may experience tool sprawl.   In order to ease the number of tools required within an environment and move towards the goal of a “Single Pane of Glass” to manage our networks, Cloudvision Portal 2019.1.x provides a built-in IPFIX/sFlow collector that will show the top flows within a network.  Once these flows are collected, they can...
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Securing Inter Domain Routing with RPKI

Problem definition The debate over challenges and solutions for Secure Interdomain Traffic Exchange is hot as ever these days. The obstacle lies in the fundamental principle of BGP – mutual trust between network operators. Unfortunately, though this principle has led to a number of incidents in the industry, to the public eye only the tip of the iceberg is visible. The results of these incidents are traffic redirection, eavesdropping, DoS attacks and black-holing, to name a few. While incidents number in thousands, the underlying issues are only a few, and vary between accidental route leak through intentional prefix hijack and...
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GTSM for BGP

Description This feature involves the use of packet’s Time to Live (TTL) (IPv4) or Hop Limit (IPv6) attributes to protect BGP peering sessions (both iBgp and eBgp) from an attacker on the network segment causing denial of service using forged IP packets by spoofing the BGP peer’s IP address. The solution is described by the RFC 3682 (Generalized TTL Security Mechanism). The user can configure a minimum TTL for incoming IP packets received from the BGP peer. BGP session will only get established if the TTL value in the received IP packet header is greater than or equal to the...
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BGP Peering – Configuration Best Practices – Security and Manageability

      BGP Peering – Configuration Best Practices – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – Security and Manageability       1) Introduction This article provides suggestions of BGP peering configuration, with general best practices and some particular considerations for manageability and security.     2) Arista EOS Security – General   It is recommended to approach security not only specifically for BGP but to englobe other aspects of security for Arista EOS. More global security topics are covered in other articles, listed below. The present article focuses solely on...
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VXLAN: security recommendations

Abstract This document provides recommendations that are advised to implement in order to increase the security in multitenant network environments built on Arista Networks devices using VXLAN. Introduction One of the crucial qualities of modern cloud network infrastructure is scalability. Scalability can’t be achieved if security of the network operations inside the cloud is compromised. As for example, load scalability is not achievable in environments where the VMs are not able to operate when the network between them is not working properly due to hijacked MAC-addresses. One of the technologies used nowadays to address the challenges with scalability inside the cloud networks...
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GTSM for BGP

Description This feature involves the use of packet’s Time to Live (TTL) (IPv4) or Hop Limit (IPv6) attributes to protect BGP peering sessions (both iBgp and eBgp) from an attacker on the network segment causing denial of service using forged IP packets by spoofing the BGP peer’s IP address. The solution is described by the RFC 3682 (Generalized TTL Security Mechanism). The user can configure a minimum TTL for incoming IP packets received from the BGP peer. BGP session will only get established if the TTL value in the received IP packet header is greater than or equal to the...
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How are people generally separating internal and DMZ networks?

Hi forum, Considering the design elements of a L3LS, the separation of functions into dedicated leaves (such as Services, Compute, Storage, Border), and given Cisco’s VDC and it’s logical separation (or rather, the broadly accepted/ marketed view that secure and less secure networks can be collapsed onto the same physical device) are people doing the same with L3LS deployments with VLANs and VXLAN?  Or are they interconnecting two L3LS ‘instances’ with border leaves with a secure gateway? Cloud datacentres seem to make no distinction between what a customer defines as secure and not secure and generally they seem to suggest...
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Logging – Basic Syslog and Beyond

Overview Logging is often viewed as a basic feature and a common element of all infrastructure devices. But the importance shouldn’t be overlooked. And the related configurations shouldn’t be taken for granted. Whether the purpose is for operations and troubleshooting or to meet compliance requirements, the topic of system logs including how they are configured and where that information is stored should be given more than passing consideration. In this article we’re going to look at basic configuration of Syslog along with some Arista related tips and tricks that will help with operations and compliance. Basic Syslog Beyond operational reasons, logging data is...
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