• Understanding and Interpreting SNMP outputs for switch entities

 
 
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This article provides an overview on how to interpret the values returned by SNMP on polling certain MIB objects related to physical entities such as sensor values of different components from a switch.

Overview of Entity MIBS

To provide a quick overview, Arista supports the following standard MIBs: 

..and also a proprietary MIB:

ENTITY-MIB describes a set of MIB objects that can be used to poll information regarding physical entities in a networking equipment such as entity name, class (if the unit is a sensor, module, fan, power supply, container etc), hardware / firmware / software revisions, serial number, manufacturer, model name etc., 

ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB defines a set of MIB in particular to poll information related to physical sensors, which are often found in networking equipment (such as chassis temperature, fan RPM, power supply voltage).

ARISTA-ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB augments the above MIB by providing information about the thresholds of various sensors in the switch (High/Low warnings, High/Low Critical values).

ENTITY-STATE-MIB defines a set of MIB objects, which can be used to poll information about the state of these entities.

How to find the correct MIB entries and OIDs

Every time when polling particular information from the switch via SNMP, it is arduous to remember the exact OID or the MIB entries (or even the MIB tree itself). Hence, we could always run a walk on .1, ‘grep’ for the relative keyword and find the MIB related information.

For example, to find the MIB objects returning power supply related information:

switch#show snmp mib walk .1 | grep "PowerSupply"

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100711000] = STRING: PowerSupply1

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100711210] = STRING: PowerSupply1 Fan 1

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100711211] = STRING: PowerSupply1 Fan 1 Sensor 1

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100721000] = STRING: PowerSupply2

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100721210] = STRING: PowerSupply2 Fan 1

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100721211] = STRING: PowerSupply2 Fan 1 Sensor 1

Use the unique index (highlighted in red), and run a snmp walk on .1 grepping for that specific index to discover the MIB entries covering information related to it. 

switch#show snmp mib walk .1 | grep "100711000"

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100711000] = STRING: PowerSupply1

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalVendorType[100711000] = OID: SNMPv2-SMI::zeroDotZero

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalContainedIn[100711000] = INTEGER: 100710000

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalContainedIn[1100711100] = INTEGER: 100711000

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalContainedIn[1100711200] = INTEGER: 100711000

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalClass[100711000] = INTEGER: powerSupply(6)

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalParentRelPos[100711000] = INTEGER: 1

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalName[100711000] = STRING:

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalHardwareRev[100711000] = STRING:

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalFirmwareRev[100711000] = STRING:

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalSoftwareRev[100711000] = STRING:

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalSerialNum[100711000] = STRING: HDLD6480513

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalMfgName[100711000] = STRING: DELTA

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalModelName[100711000] = STRING: PWR-745AC-F

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalAlias[100711000] = STRING:

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalAssetID[100711000] = STRING:

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalIsFRU[100711000] = INTEGER: true(1)

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalMfgDate[100711000] = STRING: 0-0-0,0:0:0.0,.0:0

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalUris[100711000] = ""

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalChildIndex[100710000][100711000] = INTEGER: 100711000

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalChildIndex[100711000][1100711100] = INTEGER: 1100711100

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalChildIndex[100711000][1100711200] = INTEGER: 1100711200

ENTITY-STATE-MIB::entStateLastChanged[100711000] = STRING: 2021-1-6,9:17:40.0,+0:0

ENTITY-STATE-MIB::entStateAdmin[100711000] = INTEGER: unlocked(4)

ENTITY-STATE-MIB::entStateOper[100711000] = INTEGER: enabled(3)

ENTITY-STATE-MIB::entStateUsage[100711000] = INTEGER: active(3)

ENTITY-STATE-MIB::entStateAlarm[100711000] = BITS: 80 unknown(0)

ENTITY-STATE-MIB::entStateStandby[100711000] = INTEGER: providingService(4)

Relatively, in order to find the OID, we can use the ‘show snmp mib translate’ CLI command:

switch#show snmp mib translate entPhysicalDescr.100711000

.1.3.6.1.2.1.47.1.1.1.1.2.100711000

switch#show snmp mib translate entPhysicalDescr.100721000


.1.3.6.1.2.1.47.1.1.1.1.2.100721000
switch#show snmp mib walk .1.3.6.1.2.1.47.1.1.1.1.2.100711000

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100711000] = STRING: PowerSupply1

switch#show snmp mib walk .1.3.6.1.2.1.47.1.1.1.1.2.100721000

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100721000] = STRING: PowerSupply2

Note: Append the index to the MIB like entry entPhysicalDescr.100711000 instead of using entPhysicalDescr[100711000] while using the ‘translate’ command.

Examples

Let us consider two examples on how to interpret the values returned by ENTITY based MIBs, and how to correlate them with CLI outputs.

Example 1.) Calculating and Interpreting Fan speeds

CLI command to check the fans speeds on an Arista Switch:

switch#show system environment cooling

System cooling status is: Ok

Ambient temperature: 20C

Airflow: port-side intake

                      Config Actual                 Speed                Stable

Fan            Status  Speed  Speed          Uptime Stability            Uptime

-------------- ------ ------ ------ --------------- ----------- ---------------

1/1            Ok        30%    29% 9 days, 8:04:14 Stable      9 days, 8:02:44

2/1            Ok        30%    29% 9 days, 8:04:14 Stable      9 days, 8:02:44

3/1            Ok        30%    29% 9 days, 8:04:14 Stable      9 days, 8:02:44

4/1            Ok        30%    29% 9 days, 8:04:14 Stable      9 days, 8:02:44

PowerSupply1/1 Ok        30%    33% 9 days, 8:04:03 FW Override             N/A

PowerSupply2/1 Ok        30%    33% 9 days, 8:04:03 FW Override             N/A

 

Using the ‘how to’ section, we can find the MIB object which returns the value of the Fan 1 Sensor 1.

A.) Grep for ‘Fan 1’ by running a snmp walk on .1:

switch#show snmp mib walk .1 | grep "Fan 1"

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100601110] = STRING: Fan Tray 1 Fan 1

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100601111] = STRING: Fan Tray 1 Fan 1 Sensor 1

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100602110] = STRING: Fan Tray 2 Fan 1

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100602111] = STRING: Fan Tray 2 Fan 1 Sensor 1

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100603110] = STRING: Fan Tray 3 Fan 1

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100603111] = STRING: Fan Tray 3 Fan 1 Sensor 1

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100604110] = STRING: Fan Tray 4 Fan 1

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100604111] = STRING: Fan Tray 4 Fan 1 Sensor 1

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100711210] = STRING: PowerSupply1 Fan 1

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100711211] = STRING: PowerSupply1 Fan 1 Sensor 1

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100721210] = STRING: PowerSupply2 Fan 1

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100721211] = STRING: PowerSupply2 Fan 1 Sensor 1

B.) Run a snmp walk on .1 again, and grep for the unique index:

switch#show snmp mib walk .1 | grep "100601111"

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100601111] = STRING: Fan Tray 1 Fan 1 Sensor 1

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalVendorType[100601111] = OID: SNMPv2-SMI::zeroDotZero

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalContainedIn[100601111] = INTEGER: 100601110

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalClass[100601111] = INTEGER: sensor(8)

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalParentRelPos[100601111] = INTEGER: 1

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalName[100601111] = STRING:

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalHardwareRev[100601111] = STRING:

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalFirmwareRev[100601111] = STRING:

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalSoftwareRev[100601111] = STRING:

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalSerialNum[100601111] = STRING:

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalMfgName[100601111] = STRING:

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalModelName[100601111] = STRING:

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalAlias[100601111] = STRING:

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalAssetID[100601111] = STRING:

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalIsFRU[100601111] = INTEGER: false(2)

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalMfgDate[100601111] = STRING: 0-0-0,0:0:0.0,.0:0

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalUris[100601111] = ""

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalChildIndex[100601110][100601111] = INTEGER: 100601111

ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::entPhySensorType[100601111] = INTEGER: rpm(10)

ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::entPhySensorScale[100601111] = INTEGER: units(9)

ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::entPhySensorPrecision[100601111] = INTEGER: 0

ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::entPhySensorValue[100601111] = INTEGER: 2806

ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::entPhySensorOperStatus[100601111] = INTEGER: ok(1)

ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::entPhySensorUnitsDisplay[100601111] = STRING: RPM

ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::entPhySensorValueTimeStamp[100601111] = Timeticks: (81182240) 9 days, 9:30:22.40

ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::entPhySensorValueUpdateRate[100601111] = Gauge32: 2000 milliseconds

ENTITY-STATE-MIB::entStateLastChanged[100601111] = STRING: 2021-1-6,9:17:29.0,+0:0

ENTITY-STATE-MIB::entStateAdmin[100601111] = INTEGER: unlocked(4)

ENTITY-STATE-MIB::entStateOper[100601111] = INTEGER: enabled(3)

ENTITY-STATE-MIB::entStateUsage[100601111] = INTEGER: active(3)

ENTITY-STATE-MIB::entStateAlarm[100601111] = BITS: 80 unknown(0)

ENTITY-STATE-MIB::entStateStandby[100601111] = INTEGER: providingService(4)

ARISTA-ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::aristaEntSensorThresholdLowWarning[100601111] = INTEGER: -1000000000

ARISTA-ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::aristaEntSensorThresholdLowCritical[100601111] = INTEGER: -1000000000

ARISTA-ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::aristaEntSensorThresholdHighWarning[100601111] = INTEGER: 1000000000

ARISTA-ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::aristaEntSensorThresholdHighCritical[100601111] = INTEGER: 1000000000

ARISTA-ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::aristaEntSensorStatusDescr[100601111] = STRING: No thresholds are defined

C.) Find the correct MIB object, and interpret the values obtained: 

As highlighted in the above SNMP output, entPhySensorValue which gives the value of an associated physical entity. However, the ‘Actual Speed of Fan 1’ returned by the CLI command output is 29%, while the SNMP output is 2806 (which is quite bogus to correlate). This is because the entPhySensorValue is returning a value as defined by the RFC. 

From RF3433: 

entPhySensorValue OBJECT-TYPE

    SYNTAX        EntitySensorValue

    MAX-ACCESS    read-only

    STATUS        current

    DESCRIPTION

            "The most recent measurement obtained by the agent for this

            sensor.

            To correctly interpret the value of this object, the

            associated entPhySensorType, entPhySensorScale, and

            entPhySensorPrecision objects must also be examined."

    ::= { entPhySensorEntry 4 }

Note that entPhySensorValue should be interpreted based on the values of entPhySensorType, entPhySensorScale, and entPhySensorPrecision. 

where,

  1. entPhySensorType – the unit of measurement that the sensor is reporting. 
  2. entPhySensorScale – the scale of the unit of measurement that the sensor is reporting.
  3. entPhySensorPrecision – the number of decimal places of precision in the value that the sensor is reporting (Refer RFC for more details).

Poll them next by appending the unique index as given below:

switch#show snmp mib walk entPhySensorType.100601111

ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::entPhySensorType[100601111] = INTEGER: rpm(10)


switch#show snmp mib walk entPhySensorScale.100601111

ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::entPhySensorScale[100601111] = INTEGER: units(9)


switch#show snmp mib walk entPhySensorPrecision.100601111

ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::entPhySensorPrecision[100601111] = INTEGER: 0

D.) Convert and verify the Speed%:

Here,

  1. entPhySensorType = rpm (which is the unit we need – no conversion needed).
  2. entPhySensorScale = units (units mean 10^0 = 1).
  3. entPhySensorPrecision = 0 (0 decimal places).

Therefore, there isn’t much conversion needed here: 2806 x 10^1 x rpm = 2806 rpm.

Let us get the maxSpeed from ‘show system environment cooling | json’ output:

switch#show system environment cooling | json

..

"fanTraySlots": [

        {

            "status": "ok",

            "fans": [

                {

                    "status": "ok",

                    "uptime": 1609924650.124999,

                    "maxSpeed": 9550,

                    "lastSpeedStableChangeTime": 1609924740.204952,

                    "configuredSpeed": 30,

                    "actualSpeed": 29,

                    "speedHwOverride": false,

                    "speedStable": true,

                    "label": "1/1"

                }

            ],

            "speed": 30,

            "label": "1"

        },

Now we can verify if the value returned by entPhySensorValue is 29% of 9550:

9550 x 0.29 = 2769.5 ~=  2806 (value returned by the MIB).

From a monitoring tool perspective, we can calculate the speed% using the SNMP returned output in the following way:

(2806/9550) x 100 = 29.38 % = 29% (base value) 

This is exactly the value returned by the ‘show system environment cooling’ command.

Example 2.) Calculating and Interpreting transceiver readings

CLI command to check the transceiver readings for an interface:

switch#show interfaces Et1/1 transceiver detail

mA: milliamperes, dBm: decibels (milliwatts), NA or N/A: not applicable.

A2D readouts (if they differ), are reported in parentheses.

The threshold values are calibrated.

                         High Alarm  High Warn   Low Alarm   Low Warn

           Temperature   Threshold   Threshold   Threshold   Threshold

Port       (Celsius)     (Celsius)   (Celsius)   (Celsius)   (Celsius)

-------    ------------  ----------  ----------  ----------  ----------

Et1/1      28.81         75.00       70.00       -5.00       0.00

                         High Alarm  High Warn   Low Alarm   Low Warn

           Voltage       Threshold   Threshold   Threshold   Threshold

Port       (Volts)       (Volts)     (Volts)     (Volts)     (Volts)

-------    ------------  ----------  ----------  ----------  ----------

Et1/1      3.29          3.63        3.47        2.97        3.13

                         High Alarm  High Warn   Low Alarm   Low Warn

           Current       Threshold   Threshold   Threshold   Threshold

Port       (mA)          (mA)        (mA)        (mA)        (mA)

-------    ------------  ----------  ----------  ----------  ----------

Et1/1      7.21          10.00       9.50        0.50        1.00

                         High Alarm  High Warn   Low Alarm   Low Warn

           Tx Power      Threshold   Threshold   Threshold   Threshold

Port       (dBm)         (dBm)       (dBm)       (dBm)       (dBm)

-------    ------------  ----------  ----------  ----------  ----------

Et1/1      -1.17          N/A         N/A         N/A         N/A

                         High Alarm  High Warn   Low Alarm   Low Warn

           Rx Power      Threshold   Threshold   Threshold   Threshold

Port       (dBm)         (dBm)       (dBm)       (dBm)       (dBm)

-------    ------------  ----------  ----------  ----------  ----------

Et1/1      -1.98         3.40        2.40        -13.51      -9.50

Say the target is to monitor Rx Power on interface Et1/1 via SNMP. 

Cutting to the chase, and finding the associated MIB object as mentioned in Example 1:

switch#show snmp mib walk .1 | grep et1/1

LLDP-MIB::lldpLocPortId[5] = STRING: "Ethernet1/1"

IF-MIB::ifDescr[1001] = STRING: Ethernet1/1

IF-MIB::ifName[1001] = STRING: Ethernet1/1

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100100252] = STRING: Ethernet1/1

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100301211] = STRING: DOM TX Bias Sensor for Ethernet1/1

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100301212] = STRING: DOM TX Power Sensor for Ethernet1/1

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100301213] = STRING: DOM RX Power Sensor for Ethernet1/1


switch#show snmp mib walk .1 | grep 100301213

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100301213] = STRING: DOM RX Power Sensor for Ethernet1/1

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalVendorType[100301213] = OID: SNMPv2-SMI::zeroDotZero

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalContainedIn[100301213] = INTEGER: 100301210

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalClass[100301213] = INTEGER: sensor(8)

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalParentRelPos[100301213] = INTEGER: 3

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalName[100301213] = STRING:

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalHardwareRev[100301213] = STRING:

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalFirmwareRev[100301213] = STRING:

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalSoftwareRev[100301213] = STRING:

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalSerialNum[100301213] = STRING:

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalMfgName[100301213] = STRING:

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalModelName[100301213] = STRING:

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalAlias[100301213] = STRING:

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalAssetID[100301213] = STRING:

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalIsFRU[100301213] = INTEGER: false(2)

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalMfgDate[100301213] = STRING: 0-0-0,0:0:0.0,.0:0

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalUris[100301213] = ""

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalChildIndex[100301210][100301213] = INTEGER: 100301213

ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::entPhySensorType[100301213] = INTEGER: watts(6)

ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::entPhySensorScale[100301213] = INTEGER: milli(8)

ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::entPhySensorPrecision[100301213] = INTEGER: 4

ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::entPhySensorValue[100301213] = INTEGER: 6352

ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::entPhySensorOperStatus[100301213] = INTEGER: ok(1)

ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::entPhySensorUnitsDisplay[100301213] = STRING: mW

ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::entPhySensorValueTimeStamp[100301213] = Timeticks: (81797159) 9 days, 11:12:51.59

ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::entPhySensorValueUpdateRate[100301213] = Gauge32: 6000 milliseconds

ENTITY-STATE-MIB::entStateLastChanged[100301213] = STRING: 2021-1-6,9:17:42.0,+0:0

ENTITY-STATE-MIB::entStateAdmin[100301213] = INTEGER: unlocked(4)

ENTITY-STATE-MIB::entStateOper[100301213] = INTEGER: enabled(3)

ENTITY-STATE-MIB::entStateUsage[100301213] = INTEGER: active(3)

ENTITY-STATE-MIB::entStateAlarm[100301213] = BITS: 00

ENTITY-STATE-MIB::entStateStandby[100301213] = INTEGER: providingService(4)

ARISTA-ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::aristaEntSensorThresholdLowWarning[100301213] = INTEGER: 1122

ARISTA-ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::aristaEntSensorThresholdLowCritical[100301213] = INTEGER: 446

ARISTA-ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::aristaEntSensorThresholdHighWarning[100301213] = INTEGER: 17378

ARISTA-ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::aristaEntSensorThresholdHighCritical[100301213] = INTEGER: 21878

ARISTA-ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::aristaEntSensorStatusDescr[100301213] = STRING: Sensor value 0.6340 mW is within bounds


switch#show snmp mib walk entPhySensorValue.100301213

ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::entPhySensorValue[100301213] = INTEGER: 6365

The value returned by entPhySensorValue is 6365, which needs to be converted, and interpreted the same way. Obtain the values of entPhySensorType, entPhySensorScale, and entPhySensorPrecision. 

switch#show snmp mib walk entPhySensorType.100301213

ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::entPhySensorType[100301213] = INTEGER: watts(6)


switch#show snmp mib walk entPhySensorScale.100301213

ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::entPhySensorScale[100301213] = INTEGER: milli(8)


switch#show snmp mib walk entPhySensorPrecision.100301213

ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB::entPhySensorPrecision[100301213] = INTEGER: 4

Here,

  1. entPhySensorType = watts (Conversion to dBm needed).
  2. entPhySensorScale = milli (10-3).
  3. entPhySensorPrecision = 4 (4 decimal places).

Therefore, 6365 x 10-3 x 10-4 x watts = 0.0006325 watts. 

Converting 0.0006325 watts to dBm, we get:

 0.0006325 watts = -1.9893947015 dBm ~= -1.98dBm.

-1.98dBm is exactly the value returned by the ‘show interfaces Et1/1 transceiver detail’ command.

Key Takeaways

  1. Always refer to the RFCs for MIB Object definitions if the output thrown by them isn’t user-friendly to interpret. 
  2. ‘Grep’ can be a powerful weapon. You can invariably run a snmp walk on .1 from the EOS CLI, and ‘grep’ for a relative ‘keyword’ (be it route information, interface statistics, storage/memory, hardware utilization etc.) in an attempt to find the MIB information. 

Bonus example to find the OID for InDiscards (on Ma1):

switch#show interfaces counters discards | nz

Port               InDiscards    OutDiscards

--------------- ---------------- -----------

Ma1                  16876738              0

---------           ---------      ---------

Totals               16876738              0


switch#show snmp mib walk .1 | no-more | grep Management

LLDP-MIB::lldpLocPortId[97] = STRING: "Management1"

SNMPv2-MIB::sysORDescr[6] = STRING: The SNMP Management Architecture MIB.

IF-MIB::ifDescr[999001] = STRING: Management1

IF-MIB::ifName[999001] = STRING: Management1

ENTITY-MIB::entPhysicalDescr[100110145] = STRING: Management1


switch#show snmp mib walk .1 | no-more | grep 999001 | grep InDiscards

IF-MIB::ifInDiscards[999001] = Counter32: 16876738


switch#show snmp mib translate ifInDiscards.999001

.1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.13.999001                         


switch#show snmp mib walk .1.3.6.1.2.1.2.2.1.13.999001

IF-MIB::ifInDiscards[999001] = Counter32: 16876738

Say the InDiscards on Ma1 are not constantly increasing, we can easily get the MIB object using the value of counter itself:

switch#show snmp mib walk .1 | grep 16876738

IF-MIB::ifInDiscards[999001] = Counter32: 16876738

References

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